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Dandasana (दण्डासन)

Dandasana (IPA: [dəɳɖɑːsənə] dahn-dah-sah-nah; Sanskrit: दण्डासन; IAST: Daṇḍāsana) or Staff Pose is an asana. The name comes from the Sanskrit words Danda (दन्द, Danda) meaning "stick", and Asana (आसन, Āsana) meaning "posture". (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); The foundation of all seated yoga asanas - forward bends and twists. To achieve this asana, begin

Virasana (वीरासन)

Virasana (vir-ah-sah-nah[needs IPA]; Sanskrit: वीरासन; IAST: vīrāsana) or Hero Pose is an asana. The name comes from the Sanskrit words vira meaning "man" or "hero" or "chief", and asana (आसन, Āsana) meaning "posture" or "seat" Step by Step:- Kneel on the floor (on a folded blanket to pad your knees, shins, and

Simhasana (सिंहासन)

Simhasana (Sanskrit: सिंहासन; IAST: Siṁhāsana) or Lion Pose is an asana. The name comes from the Sanskrit words simha (सिंहा) meaning "lion", and asana (आसन, āsana) meaning "posture" or "seat" The asana resembles a seated lion, hence the name Simha (lion in Sanskrit) asana. The practitioner's facial expressions are modified to resemble

Vajrasana (वज्रासन)

Vajrasana (vahj-rah-sah-nah[needs IPA]; Sanskrit: वज्रासन; IAST: vajrāsana), Adamantine Pose, Diamond Pose, Kneeling Pose, Pelvic Pose and Thunderbolt Pose is an asana. The name comes from the Sanskrit words vajra meaning "thunderbolt" or "diamond" and asana (आसन, āsana) meaning "posture" or "seat" Vajrasana also called as Thunderbolt pose is the only asana which

Siddhasana (सिद्धासन)

Siddhasana (Sanskrit: सिद्धासन; IAST: siddhāsana) or Accomplished Pose is an asana. The name comes from the Sanskrit words siddha (सिद्धा; siddha) meaning both "perfect" and "adept",[2] and asana (आसन; āsana) meaning "posture" or "seat". Step by Step:- Place the left heel at the anus, the terminal opening of the alimentary canal or

Padmasana (पद्मासन)

The Lotus Position (Sanskrit: पद्मासन [pɐd̪mɑːs̪ɐn̪ɐ], IAST: padmāsana) is a cross-legged sitting asana originating in meditative practices of ancient India, in which the feet are placed on the opposing thighs. It is an established asana, commonly used for meditation, in the Hindu Yoga, Jain and Buddhist contemplative traditions. The asana

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